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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
to take the time to know who they were. seth doane now with a lesson for all of us. >> reporter: there's barely enough room for the students in tom clark's classroom. >> this looks like a hat from afghanistan. >> yes, it is. here's another one from afghanistan. here's a russian helmet with bullet holes in it. >> reporter: it's like a museum in here. >> well, it is. it looks like a garage sale. >> reporter: if it's a museum, his students have been its curators for 27 years. >> i want you to look over these files. >> reporter: each semester, this teacher at lake central high school in st. john, indiana, hands out names of troops from his state who died at war and asimes students to find their families. >> we're putting a story behind their names. they're no longer just names. they are people. they have lives. they went to school. they had friends. they had feelings. >> reporter: how many families have your students talked with? >> hundreds. >> reporter: did you ever care about history before this class? >> honestly, no. i was just kind of one of the people that were like, um, like, it's
of those who died in the world trade center? hollywood or the families? seth doane with the controversy over "zero dark thirty." >> it's a treasure to remember. it's a treasured message. it's ours. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. to be honest, we were his tent at first to begin this broadcast with yet another scientific study about what we should or should not eat. but our dr. jon lapook brought us what he says is the most definitive study yet that the so-called mediterranean diet-- including olive oil and nuts, wine, and fish can prevent the leading cause of death in america: heart disease. and it does it much better than the low-fat diet can. jon has more on why we should pay attention to this study and what it found. >> reporter: today's study compared the mediterranean diet to a low-fat diet among nearly 7,500 patients at high risk for heart disease. after five years, those on the mediterranean diet had 30% fewer heart attacks, strokes, or deaths from heart disease. dr. tara narula is a preventative cardiologist
coming, the crowds and the questions. so seth doane tracked down the man who answers them. >> reporter: it's an architectural marvel, frozen in time spanning 69 acres with 125- foot ceilings, 75-foot windows and italian marble floors. it's been called a temple to transportation. >> the entire population of the entire state of alaska walks you through here every day. >> reporter: danny brucker has been giving rather animated tours of grand central for 25 years. >> it is a palace that celebrates the everyday person walking through. it was built for them. who isn't in love with it? >> reporter: most people don't think of a train station as a palace. >> well, first of all, it's a terminal. never say station. it's a terminal because trains terminate here. but it is the most magnificent, the most beautiful -- it is a celebration of train transportation that established and built this nation. >> reporter: grand central terminal was built after a 1902 train crash killed 15 people and sparked the cry to move trains under the busy streets of new
will be going up on one of the many small miracles made possible by the american sacrifice. here's seth doane. >> reporter: milad yousufi grew up in war-torn afghanistan, and though he did not have a piano he did have an imagination. >> reporter: wait a second, you drew a picture of a piano and you pretended to play? >> yeah, yeah. >> reporter: because there was no access to a piano? >> yeah, yeah. >> reporter: no access because the taliban, who controlled afghanistan for five years banned all non-religious music. >> reporter: today, the taliban is out of power and 18-year-old yousufi is making up for lost time. he's joined afghanistan's first youth orchestra which, thanks to american funding, is on tour in the u.s. >> afghan music is three plus four. >> reporter: we met as they practiced with the maryland youth orchestra. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ how is it to play with american students? >> reporter: the orchestra is the brainchild of achmed sarmast who fled afghanistan during taliban rule. he returned in 2008, the mission of reviving the arts by opening a music school. >> reporter: why is music
in the united states. it's the first orchestra created in afghanistan in more than three decades. as seth doane reports, it's performing on some of the country's biggest stages. >> reporter: milad yousufi grew up in war-torn afghanistan, and although he did not have a piano, he did have an imagination. >> i was drawing a piano on paper and then i was playing it. >> reporter: wait a second. you drew a picture of a piano and pretended to play it? >> yeah, yeah. >> reporter: because there was no access to a piano. >> yeah, yeah. >> reporter: no access because the taliban who was in control for five years banned all religious music. >> if they knew you were listening to the music, they probably would kill you because they did not like music. >> reporter: today the taliban is out of power and 18-year-old yousufi is making up for lost time. he's joined afghanistan's first youth orchestra, which thanks to american funding is on tour in the u.s. >> afghan music is three plus four. >> reporter: we met as they practiced with the maryland youth orchestra. >> how is it to pla
are lost, but the library is trying to reverse that. seth doane looks at an effort to save america's cultural past. ♪ >> reporter: it's 1936 louis armstrong recording is an artifact nearly lost to time. it's a nickel-plated disk widely used to record sound in the first half of the 20th century. >> it's the equivalent to an original camera negative for a motion picture. >> reporter: patrick loughney is leading the effort to save these cultural relics for the library of congress. >> what goes on here is the archaeology of american popular audio visual history. >> reporter: when you think of the library of cob you think of old documents and typewriter smudged paper. not here. >> no. they were considered a cultural record, and this is a collection of cylinder recordings. >> reporter: these cylinders invented by thomas edison in the 1800s were recently donated by a private collector. they're the first known devices to record sound. >> it was literally beeswax and it could melt if heated up too long or break if dropped. >> reporter: this one digitally restored is
this morning to honor the transportation icon. seth doane got an inside look at this historic building from a man who seems to hold all the answers. >> reporter: it's an architectural marvel, frozen in time, spanning 69 acres, with 125-foot ceilings, 75-foot windows, and italian marble floors. it's been called a temple to transportation. >> the entire population of the entire state of alaska walks through here every day. >> reporter: danny brucker has been giving animated tours through grand central for years. >> it's a palace that celebrates the everyday person walking through here. it was built for them. who doesn't love that. >> reporter: most people don't think of train station as a palace. >> first of all it's a terminal. never say station. it's a terminal because trains terminate here. it is beautiful. it is a celebration of train transportation that established and built this nation. >> reporter: grand central terminal was built after a 1902 train crash killed 15 people and sparked the cry to move trains under the busy streets of new york city. that required
they were. seth doane now with a lesson for all of us. >> reporter: there's barely enough room for the students in tom clark's classroom. this looks like a hat from afghanistan. >> yes, it is. here's another one from afghanistan. there's a russian helmet with bullet holes in it. >> reporter: it's like a museum in here. >> it is. or it looks like a garage sale. >> reporter: if it's a museum, his students have been its curators for 27 years. >> i want you to look over these files. >> reporter: each semester, this teacher at lake central high school in saint john, indiana, hands out names of troops from his state who died at war and assigns students to find their families. >> we're putting a story behind their names. they're no longer just names. they are people. they had lives. they went to school. they had friends. they had feelings. >> reporter: how many families have your students talked with? >> hundreds. >> reporter: did you ever care about history before this class? >> honestly, no. i was just kind of one of the people that were like
a nation. seth doane, cbs news, st. john, indiana. >> life-saving and life-changing lessons being taught in that classroom. >>> well, coming up after your local news on "cbs this morning," the latest on the deadly storm that buried parts of the midwest. we'll tell you where the system is headed. >>> plus, an exclusive interview with the former mayor of san diego accused of stealing millions from a charity to feed her gambling addiction. >>> and comedian george lopez stops by the studio. that's the "cbs morning news" for this friday morning. thanks for watching. i'm anne-marie green. have a great day. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >> your realtime captioner: linda marie macdonald >>> good morning. it is friday effect 22. good to have you with us. i'm frank mallicoat. >> i'm michelle griego. time now 4:30. >> i like the way you say friday. >> said with such passion. >> i wish it was monday all over again. i have had so much fun this week! but we have great weather around the bay area coming our way today and this weekend. chilly to start with. more
that was up for best picture. seth doane reports that's created a controversy. >> reporter: the film "zero dark thirty" starts with actual voices of victims of 9/11 recorded as think made their -- had -- recorded as they made their last phone calls. >> there's no one here yet and the floor is completely engulfed. >> should never have happened. >> reporter: for mary and frank fetchet, it brings back painful memories. one of those voices was their son, brad, who worked on the 89th floor of the world trade center's south tower. >> when i arrived home, i found brad's message on my phone. of course, you know, these were his last words, in my view, because we never heard from him again. >> reporter: as parents, how important, how significant, is this message that brad left? >> the ongoing anguish we've gone through, it's a treasured remembrance. it's a treasured message. it's ours. >> reporter: they say that treasured remembrance was used in the film without their permission. >> my first thought was: isn't anything sacred anymore? >> reporter: you used this
recordings from that era are gone forever. but as seth doane tells us, the library has a plan to stop this bleeding of priceless history. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: this 1936 louis armstrong recording is an artifact nearly lost to time. ♪ ♪ it's a nickel-plated disk widely used to record sound in the first half of the 20th century. >> it's the equivalent to an original camera negative for a motion picture. >> reporter: patrick lockne is leading the effort to safe these cultural relics for the library of congress. >> what goes on here is the archaeology of american popular audio-visual history. >> reporter: when you think of the library of congress you think of old documents and typewriter-smudged papers. not here. >> no. it's quite remarkable that the library very early on got into the acquisition of sound recordings and then radio programs. they were considered a cultural record. and this is a collection of cylinder recordings. >> reporter: these cylinders, invented by thomas edison in the 1800s, were recently donated by a private collector. they're the first known devices to record so
of the blizzard from the storm's path to those travel headaches and we start with seth doane in new york city. seth already some snowflakes. >> reporter: that's right, norah. good morning to you. we're starting to see the first flakes falling here. the city is bracing for up to 2 foot of snow and up to 50 to 60-mile-an-hour wind gusts which could complicate removing some of that snow. the city is standing by with some 250,000 tons of salt. some of that you can see behind me in this salt depot. they'll be spreading it on the road with 365 salt spreaders. the mayor is not taking any chances with this storm after so much criticism after the snow blizzard of 2010 where some remained snowbound for days. also concerning with this storm is a storm surge. expecting 3 to 5 feet in some areas. that in and of itself is not particularly significant but in areas of queens brooklyn long island that received so much damage after storm sandy, those coastal defenses are down and there's a concern that even a smaller storm surge could cause some localized flooding. there is a bit of good
doane in new york city. seth, already some snowflakes. >> reporter: that's right, norah. good morning to you. we're starting to see the first flakes falling here. the city is bracing for up to 2 foot of snow and up to 50 to 60-mile-an-hour wind gusts which could complicate removing some of that snow. the city is standing by with some 250,000 tons of salt. some of that you can see behind me in this salt depot. they'll be spreading it on the road with 365 salt spreaders. the mayor is not taking any chances with this storm after so much criticism after the snow blizzard of 2010 where some remained snowbound for days. also concerning with this storm is a storm surge. expecting 3 to 5 feet in some areas. that in and of itself is not particularly significant but in areas of queens, brooklyn, long island that received so much damage after storm sandy, those coastal defenses are down and there's a concern that even a smaller storm surge could cause some localized flooding. there is a bit of good news in all of this, which is the bulk of the storm is supposed to hit later into friday and satur
headaches. so we start with seth doane in new york city where it's all beginning. seth, good morning. >> reporter: good morning and good morning to our viewers in the west. as you can see, it is already snowing here in new york. we're expecting upwards of a foot of snow and wind gusts of 50 to 60 miles per hour which could really complicate that snow removal. i'm standing in front of some of the 250,000 tons of salt the city has raised and spread on its roadways in 365 salt-spreading trucks. the mayor is not taking any chances here in new york city after being criticized so much for his mishandling of the snow removal back in that blizzard of 2010. some residents were snowbound for days. one of the other real concerns with this blizzard is the forecast storm surge, only three to five feet in the forecast but that could be a real problem in parts of long island queens and brooklyn so devastated during superstorm sandy those natural coastal defenses are gone, and even a relatively low three to five-foot storm surge could create a problem. we're starting to see s
for a crime that could cost the country an estimat 21- billion-dollars. cbs reporter seth doane talked one businessman who had his refund stolen. >>> nearly 200 indictments costing the country about $21 million. we talked to a businessman who had his tax refund stolen. >> reporter: in 2011 the businessman joe bianco waited patiently for a $10,000 tax refund. when he contacted the irs, they said it was paid. >> somebody had filed where they forged a w-2 from wal-mart and claimed a refund, got the refund using my name and social security number. >> reporter: in the past 12 months the irs confirmed that 770,000 cases of refund fraud due to identity theft. up to 50,000 cases the year before. thousands of more are still under investigation. >> reporter: adam levin is the chairman of the identity theft 911. a recovery service for victims. he said that the crime wave is a result of a faster digital irs. >> unfortunately as that process has evolved, security has been compromised. >> reporter: the irs has doubled the number of the i.d. theft caseworkers to 3,000 in 2012. they cracked down on 2,400
arrests in identifying theft-related cases -- rather identity theft-related cases. as seth doane reports, irs is struggling to keep ahead of the crime wave. >> reporter: in 2011 he waited patiently for a $10,000 tax refund. when he contacted the irs, it said he had already been paid. >> somebody filed with a forged w-2 from walmart, claimed a refund, got the refund, using my name and social security number. >> reporter: in the past 12 months irs confirms 770,000 refund cases due to identity theft, up from 250,000 cases from the year before. thousands more are still under investigation. >> phony w-2 and a social security number and you're in business. >> reporter: adam levin is chairman of identity theft 911. he said it's the result of a faster digital irs. >> unfortunately as that process has evolved, security has become compromised. >> the irs has doubled the number of i.d. theft caseworkers in 2012. it cracked down on 2,400 cases on phony tax preparers as well as ordinary pleas with access to social security numbers including bank tellers, hospital workers and even members of the aroun
files for you. seth doane c b sbs news, new york. >>> president obama teed up with tiger woods sunday, but the white house reporters say they're the ones who were tee'd off. the president and woods shot a round at a club in florida, but the media was not allowed to take any pictures. reporters expressed their frustration, but the white house says press access was consistent with other presidential golf outings. >>> straight ahead, your monday morning weather, and in sports, danica patrick outraces the boys, making history as the first woman to win the poll at the daytona 500. the daytona 500. whatever it takes, get to sears presidents day sale mattress close out. get 24 month special financing. and save up to 60%, plus get an extra 10% off. and free delivery. this is eye opening. this is sears. >>> here's a look at today's forecast in some cities is around the country. new york, mostly sunny, 35 the high. miami, 70 the high. chicago and dallas can expect rain today, 45 and 71. los angeles, 63 the high. >>> and time now for a check of the national forecast. the firs
. seth doane is with them. >> this is supposed to be a high wall. all of this is leveled. where is the ocean going to go? it's going to go right over it. >> the sea berm that used tohood w protect franca costa's neighborhood was damaged by hurricane irene in 2011 and destroyed by super-storm sandy last october. she's anxiously watching the ocean. >> i need to come back in a couple hours and see where it is. >> keep your eye on the water? >> that's the main thing. i have to keep my eye on where the water is. >> reporter: when sandy hit, a wall of water nearly ten feet high washed through costa's w staten island neighborhood. her ho her house was one of a handful left standing.>> my >> my house got destroyed. it drowned. there was eight feet on the outside and six feet on the inside. >> reporter: thanks to neighbors and friends, flood insurance and fema, this 47-year-old legal secretary was able to rebuild. hou >> i just got back in my house in january, and now a couple of weeks later, we're being hit by a blizzard, a nor'easter. a blizzard wouldn't be so bad,. that's just snow,
met members of the church who had been sexually abused at the hands of priests. seth doane met with one of those people, the people in that meeting, today. >> i remember looking out these stained glass windows going "god help me, this isn't happening" while he was fondling me grabbing me. >> reporter: you were just 11 at the time? >> yes. >> reporter: bernie mcdade said he was sexually abused by a priest when he was an altar boy at st. james in salem, massachusetts. >> quite frankly i was brought up as a catholic to think that these people were good-- good in nature. and all i'd been surrounded by is deception. >> reporter: investigating sex abuse was among the assignments for then-cardinal ratzinger during his more than 20 years in the vatican office that deals with church discipline. but he was criticized for not moving quickly to defrock priests who molested children. but as pope, benedict apologized publicly to victims. >> reporter: he was the first pope to meet with victims, including bernie mcdade. >> he wouldn't talk to me. he would look down and go "yes yes, yes, my son
reports from los angeles. >> i still see that we're in a deep recession. >> pelley: and seth doane with a lesson in the ultimate sacrifice. high schoolers meet the families of fallen heroes. >> instead of just memorizing it, they learn to feel history to feel what america's all about. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. to the syrian dictator bashar al-assad, it must feel like damascus is shrinking. today, three massive bombs tore through the heart of the city near the soul of his reign. the largest detonated outside the headquarters of assad's ruling political party. at least 53 were found dead, mangled bodies amid blazing wreckage. the other two bombs exploded outside offices of assad's feared intelligence agency killing another 22. rebels also claimed today that their mortar rounds hit the army's central command building. damascus, the capital, was the last city to mostly hold the vicious war at bay. the rebellion began nearly two
center? hollywood or the families? seth doane with the controversy over "zero dark thirty." >> it's a treasure to remember. it's a treasured message. it's ours. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. to be honest, we were hesitant at first to begin this broadcast with yet another scientific study about what we should or should not eat. but our dr. jon lapook brought us what he says is the most definitive study yet that the so-called mediterranean diet-- including olive oil and nuts wine, and fish can prevent the leading cause of death in america: heart disease. and it does it much better than the low-fat diet can. jon has more on why we should pay attention to this study and what it found. >> reporter: today's study compared the mediterranean diet to a low-fat diet among nearly 7,500 patients at high risk for heart disease. after five years, those on the mediterranean diet had 30% fewer heart attacks, strokes, or
will not suffer similar surprises. seth doan, cbs news, new canaan, connecticut. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs this morning," the latest on the deadly blizzard hitting the plains and midwest. that's the "cbs morning news" for this tuesday. thanks for watching. i'm anne-marie green. have a great day. i'm anne-marie green. have a great day. >> your realtime captioner: linda marie macdonald >>> if you only know what happens before the show. good morning, everyone. [ laughter ] >> it's tuesday, february 26. good to be here. i'm frank mallicoat. >> i'm michelle griego. time now is 4:30. lawrence, i have no idea what he is talking about. >> we're ready to go here today. are you kidding? hey, guys! got a great day ahead. going to see a lot of sunshine. just patchy fog at the coastline. temperatures in the 30s and 40s. you would be surprised how warm these temperatures will get today. we'll talk about that coming up. >> beautiful shot of the bay bridge, all the lights across the span, as well. towards the bay bridge toll plaza, there are a couple of la
. and who owns the voices of those who died in the world trade center? hollywood or the families? seth doane with the controversy over "zero dark thirty." >> it's a treasure to remember. it's a treasured message. it's ours. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. to be honest we were his tent at first to begin this broadcast with yet another scientific study about what we should or should not eat.
're in a deep recession. >> pelley: and seth doane with a lesson in the ultimate sacrifice-- high high schoolers meet the families of fallen heroes. >> instead of just memorizing it, they learn to feel history, to feel what america's all about. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. to the syrian dictator bashar al-assad, it must feel like damascus is shrinking. today, three massive bombs tore through the heart of the city near the soul of
made before 1930 have been lost forever. seth doane shows the race to save america's cultural heritage. ♪ >> reporter: this 1936 louis armstrong recording is an artifact nearly lost to time. it's a nickel-plated lacquer disk widely used to record sound in the first half of the 20th century. >> by going back to metal masters, we can go back to the source material and get the best possible preservation copy. >> reporter: in some ways, this is the blueprint the original? >> it is. the equivalent to an original camera negative for a motion picture. >> reporter: patrick loughney is leading the effort to save these cultural relics for the library of congress. >> what goes on is the archaeology of american popular audio visual history. >> reporter: the cylinders made of bees wax were invented by thomas edison. they're the first known devices to record sound. this one holds a campaign song for william mckinley. ♪ >> reporter: when you think of the library of congress you think of documents and typewriter-smudged papers. not here. >> no, it's remarkable that th
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)